Brookdale Mathematics Courses

"The great body of physical, a great deal of the essential fact of financial science, and endless social and political problems are only accessible and only thinkable to those who have had a sound training in mathematical analysis, and the time may not be very remote when it will be understood that for complete initiation as an efficient citizen of one of the new great complex world-wide states that are now developing, it is as necessary to be able to compute, to think in averages and maxima and minima, as it is now to be able to read and write."  – H.G. Wells

"Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write."  – H.G. Wells


The following courses are offered by the mathematics department. See the newspaper or WebAdvisor for the scheduling of specific courses.


MATH–011

Prealgebra, Part I; 4 credits

This course covers the first half of the content of MATH 015 (the second half is covered by MATH 012). The MATH 011-–012 sequence prepares students for elementary algebra. In MATH 011, operations with whole numbers, fractions, and integers will be reinforced through application problems. Other topics include organizing data in tables and graphs, introduction to probability, formulas, practical geometry, evaluating algebraic expressions, expressing rules using variables (input/output tables), absolute value, and solving simple algebraic equations. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: Students taking MATH 011 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.
(Prerequisite: None; placement is based on scores on the college placement test)

MATH–012

Prealgebra, Part II; 4 credits

This course covers the second half of the content of MATH 015 (the first half is covered by MATH 011). The MATH 011-–012 sequence prepares students for elementary algebra. MATH 012 begins with a brief review of MATH 011 and then covers decimals, measurement and additional topics in geometry, solving simple equations, introduction to statistics, percent, ratio, and proportion. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. Note: Students taking MATH 012 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.
(Prerequisites: MATH 011)

MATH–015

Prealgebra; 4 credits

This course prepares students for elementary algebra. Operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers are reinforced through application problems. Other topics include organizing data in tables and graphs, introduction to probability and statistics, formulas, ratio and proportion, percent, practical geometry, evaluating algebraic expressions, expressing rules using variables (input/output tables), absolute value, and solving simple algebraic equations. Some class time may be spent in the Math Lab. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: Students taking MATH 015 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.
(Prerequisites: None; placement is based on scores on the college placement test.)

MATH–021

Introductory Algebra; 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the concepts and methods of algebra. Numerical, graphical, and symbolic tools and techniques are used to apply algebra to real-–world situations. Topics include creating and translating algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, inequalities and formulas, graphing and writing linear functions, and solving linear systems. Applications are included throughout the course. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: Students taking MATH 021 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.
(Prerequisites: MATH 015 or MATH 012 or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in computation.)

MATH–022

Algebra Skills; 3 credits

This course provides students who have completed MATH 021 with the necessary skills and concepts to continue the study of algebra in MATH 151 or MATH 161. This course begins with a review of MATH 021 and continues with polynomial and exponential expressions, factoring, quadratic equations, rational and radical expressions and equations. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements.
(Prerequisite: MATH 021)

MATH–025

Elementary Algebra; 4 credits

This course is a review of elementary algebra and requires previous experience in algebra. The course is intended for students who need to take MATH 151 or MATH 161. The topics include linear equations and inequalities, functions and function notations, graphs and equations of linear functions, systems of linear equations, polynomial and exponential expressions, factoring, quadratic equations, rational and radical expressions and equations. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: Students taking MATH 025 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course.
(Prerequisite: MATH 015 or MATH 012, or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in computation.)

MATH–035

Geometry; 2 credits

This course is for students who have not had a recent course in plane geometry and who plan to take trigonometry and/or calculus or need a course in geometry to meet the entrance requirements for another college. Topics include the fundamental definitions and concepts of plane geometry, methods of proof, and some topics from solid geometry. Problems will be approached from geometric and algebraic perspectives. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on hands-–on activities and problem solving. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. NOTE: MATH 035 is offered only in the Winterim term.
(Prerequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025, or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–131 (M)

Statistics; 4 credits

This course begins with descriptive statistics, including graphical representations of data and measures of central tendency, position and variation. Basic probability concepts lead to the study of the binomial and normal probability distributions. The course continues with the Central Limit Theorem and its use in the development of estimation through confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. The course concludes with Chi Square tests and linear correlation and regression. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts.
(Prerequisite: MATH 021or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–136 (M)

Mathematics for the Liberal Arts; 3 credits

This is a survey course with topics chosen from problem solving, sets, logic, numeration systems, geometry, probability and statistics, consumer mathematics, graph theory, and voting theory.
(Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025, or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–137 (M)

Finite Mathematics; 3 credits

This course contains topics chosen from linear functions, matrices, linear programming, sets, probability theory, game theory, and Markov chains. Mathematical models will be used to solve problems in business and the social and behavioral sciences. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts through graphs and specialized programs.
(Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025, or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–145 (M)

Algebraic Modeling; 4 credits

This course is an intermediate algebra course in which examples are drawn from real life and skills are learned in the context of these applications. Topics include functions and their properties and associated algebraic skills, and modeling using linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, rational, and radical functions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department. The course may be used as a prerequisite for MATH 146 and MATH 156 but NOT MATH 152 or MATH 153.
(Prerequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–146 (M)

Advanced Topics in Mathematics for the Liberal Arts; 4 credits

This is a survey course with topics chosen from the mathematics of voting, fair division, apportionment, Euler circuits, the Traveling Salesman Problem, networks, scheduling, symmetry, and fractal geometry. NOTE: MATH 146 is offered only in the Spring and Summer II terms.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 145 or MATH 151.)

MATH–151 (M)

Intermediate Algebra; 4 credits

This course prepares students for courses that require algebraic skills beyond those taught in Elementary Algebra. Topics include equations, inequalities, linear systems in two and three variables, complex numbers, and applications of functions: linear, exponential, logarithmic, quadratic, polynomial, rational, and radical. In addition, the course provides a basic introduction to right triangle trigonometry, vectors, and the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department.
(Prerequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–152 (M)

Trigonometry; 3 credits

This course, followed by MATH 153, prepares students for the study of calculus. Topics include functions and function notation, rate of change and linear functions, transformations of functions, a review of right triangle trigonometry, graphing trigonometric functions, applications leading to sinusoidal graphs, trigonometric functions through the unit circle, some basic identities, solving equations, identities as tools for rewriting trigonometric expressions, the double and half-angle identities, quadratic functions, power functions, and polynomial functions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required the specific model is determined by the department. (Prerequisites:  MATH 035 and a grade of C or higher in MATH 151)

MATH–153 (M)

Pre-–Calculus Mathematics; 4 credits

This course, along with MATH 152, prepares students for a college level calculus sequence. Special emphasis is placed on functions as mathematical models, and algebraic skills are treated in context. Topics studied include functions and their graphs and properties, and the functions studied include linear, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department.
(Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 152 may be taken concurrently with MATH 153. A grade of C or higher in MATH 152 is required as a prerequisite.)

MATH–156 (M)

Mathematics for Management and the Social Sciences; 3 credits

This course prepares students for a college level business calculus course. Functions and their graphs are studied, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Topics also include systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, linear programming (graphical solution and simplex method) and the mathematics of finance. All topics include applications in the management, life and social sciences. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 145 or MATH 151.)

MATH–161 (M)

Technical Mathematics I; 4 credits

This is the first of three courses (followed by Math 162 and Math 263) intended specifically for students of the various technology programs offered at Brookdale Community College. Topics to be studied in MATH 161 include significant digits, linear and quadratic functions, laws of exponents and roots, linear systems in two and three variables, determinants, triangle trigonometry (including the Laws of Sines and Cosines), the trigonometric functions, vectors, and the complex number system. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department.
(Prerequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the college's basic skills requirement in algebra.)

MATH–162 (M)

Technical Mathematics II; 4 credits

This is the second of three courses (after MATH 161 and before MATH 263) intended specifically for students of the various technology programs offered at Brookdale Community College. Topics to be studied in MATH 162 include a continued refinement of algebra skills, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, variation, conic sections, polar coordinates, and topics in statistics. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. A graphing calculator is required -– the specific model is determined by the department. NOTE: MATH 162 is offered only in the Fall.
(Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in MATH 161 or MATH 152.)

MATH–171 (M)

Calculus I; 4 credits

This is a first semester scientific calculus course and the topics include limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, and integrals, including the Fundamental Theorems. Algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be studied. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non-routine problems.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 153 and MATH 152.)

MATH–172 (M)

Calculus II; 4 credits

This course is a continuation of MATH 171, Calculus I. Topics include applications of the definite integral, such as area, volume, arc length, and average value, techniques of integration with emphasis on substitution and integration by parts, approximate integration and error formulas, differential equations and applications to growth and decay, infinite sequences and series, power series, and Taylor series. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non–routine problems.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 171.)

MATH–176 (M)

Calculus With Business Applications; 4 credits

This course covers differential and integral calculus with applications in business, economics, and the life sciences. Topics include functions and their graphs, constructing mathematical models, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications and exponential and logarithmic functions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic through the use of computer software in class.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 156.)

MATH–226

Discrete Mathematics; 4 credits

This course is intended for students of mathematics or computer science. The course examines the theoretical and applied mathematical foundations for the discipline of computer science. Topics include sets, logic, methods of proof, functions, number theory, counting techniques, discrete probability, graphs and trees, relations, and Boolean functions. Mathematical reasoning and proofs will be stressed. Applications are drawn from the field of computer science. A prior programming course, while recommended, is not necessary. NOTE: MATH 226 is offered only in the Summer II term.
(Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MATH 172.)

MATH–263 (M)

Applied Calculus; 4 credits

This is the third of three courses (after MATH 161 and MATH 162) intended specifically for students of the various technology programs offered at Brookdale Community College. This course covers differential and integral calculus with technology applications. Topics include functions, limits, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications, calculus of transcendental functions, and integration techniques, including tables of integrals. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic through the use of computer software and graphing calculators in class. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. NOTE: MATH 263 is offered only in the Spring term of odd–numbered years.
(Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in MATH 161 and MATH 162.)

MATH–273 (M)

Calculus III; 4 credits

This course, a continuation of MATH 172, Calculus II, completes the study of elementary calculus. Topics include polar equations, vectors and vector–valued functions, surfaces in space and functions of several variables, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, and topics from vector analysis. Applications will be considered throughout the course. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non–routine problems.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 172.)

MATH–274 (M)

Elementary Differential Equations; 4 credits

This is an introductory course in concepts and applications of differential equations. Topics include classical methods of solving first– and higher–order differential equations, mathematical models for phenomena such as growth and decay, chemical reactions, motion of a body, spring–mass systems and electric circuits, qualitative and numerical aspects of differential equations, and systems of differential equations. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non–routine problems. NOTE: MATH 274 is offered only in the Spring and Summer II terms.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 273.)

MATH–285

Linear Algebra; 3 credits

This is an introductory course in concepts and applications of linear algebra. Topics include solutions of systems of linear equation using matrices and determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and the problem of diagonalizing a square matrix. Applications, including Markov chains, the least squares fit problem, and polynomial interpolation, are included throughout the course. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives, including graphical, numerical, verbal, and algebraic through the use of computer software in class. NOTE: MATH 285 is offered only in the Summer II term.
(Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MATH 172.)

MATH–295

Special Project – Mathematics; 1 to 3 credits

MATH 295 is a course designed for students who wish to study an advanced topic in mathematics not included in one of our currently offered courses. Topics may be in a variety of areas, including fractal geometry, statistics and probability theory, abstract algebra and others. Before registering for the course the student must obtain a faculty advisor who will develop and submit a detailed program of study for the student.
(Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MATH 172.)