Top 10 Research Sites

Ten is an arbitrary number, but there is a staggering number of valuable research sites available. To try to list them all would be an overwhelming task and probably become redundant for our visitors. So we thought we'd keep the list short, sweet, and, therefore, more useful. The following is a list of sites we invite you to visit before, during, and after your 122 research projects. These are sites that we as teachers visit for our own research and that students have found to be most helpful to them at every stage of the writing and research process. We hope you find rewards during your visits as we and our students have over the past few years. (This list will change, so be sure to "bookmark" or make "favorites" out of the ones you like.)

The New York Times

The Internet Public Library

The Library of Congress

The Columbia University Library News Links

The White House Web Site

Educational Resources Information Center

The Atlantic Monthly

Mother Jones

The National Review

Arts & Letters Daily

The New York Times

The New York Times is considered to be by many teachers and scholars the best research source available. It contains "all the news that's fit to print," and more, so much more, in the arts, business, sports, and sciences. The "opinion" section alone is an invaluable source for issues and for excellent examples of persuasive writing. Visiting the site is free, but you may have to set up a password (at no charge) to dig deeper into some of its sections.

Internet Public Library

The Internet Public Library acts as a virtual library, organizing its information the way a "real time" library does. The sites it includes are of excellent quality and well-established as accredited research works. It contains links to hundreds of reference works and thousands of journals, magazines and newspapers from all over the United States and from around the world. In addition, it provides special exhibits on art, music, history, politics, anthropology, literary criticism and more.

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the national library of the United States. The site claims of its collections that they "comprise the world's most comprehensive record of human creativity and knowledge." It is the world's largest library. (How could we not include it in our top ten?)

Columbia University Internet News Links

The Columbia University Library Web Internet News Links Page not only contains links to newspapers and journals but to Wire Services and Internet TV and Radio based News Services. For some variety in your research sources try this excellent site.

The White House

The White House Web Site allows users to link to all online resources made available by U.S. government agencies. Available are texts including speeches, press briefings, news releases, executive orders, cabinet- level agency information, as well as graphics, photos, sound, and video. Visitors can even e-mail the President, Vice President, the First Lady. Talk about primary sources!

ERIC

ERIC, the Educational Resources Information Center, is the leading database for education and education-related articles. It is a self-proclaimed "national information system designed to provide users with ready access to an extensive body of education-related literature." Don't be misled by what may seem to a be a site that is too specific to one discipline (teaching). Can you think of any field or even topic that is not somehow connected to learning? No matter what issue you're researching this site can provide scholarly, academic, and quality articles and information.

The Atlantic Monthly

The Atlantic Monthly is a magazine that was first published in November of 1857. At that time it billed itself as a "journal of literature, politics, science, and the arts." Today it continues to thrive as one of the top magazines in the world. In 1995, it won the prestigious National Magazine Award for Reporting. It's editors pride themselves as being able to create a "place" where scientists, politicians, businesspeople, writers, members of the military, the clergy, and academe, Republicans and Democrats alike, blacks and whites, the believer and the unbeliever, can regularly hear one another speak." Keep an eye on this site at anytime during your research; you will always find valuable and provocative writing no matter what your topic.

Mother Jones

Mojo Wire, the online version of Mother Jones Magazine, is by its own admission, "a magazine of investigation and ideas for independent thinkers. Provocative and unexpected articles inform readers and inspire action toward positive social change. Colorful and personal, Mother Jones, challenges conventional wisdom, exposes abuses of power, helps redefine stubborn problems and offers fresh solutions." Have fun comparing the opinions of your topic in Mojo Wire to the ultra-conservative opinions found in The National Review below.

The National Review

The National Review is America's magazine for conservatism. It contrasts so well with Mother Jones' progressive opinions that we could not resist having them rub up against each other on this page. Politics makes strange bedfellows; even "stranger" things can happen when you read such contrasting views side by side. Compare the magazine's "Mission Statement" written by William F. Buckley, Jr., for instance, to the description of the Foundation for National Progress, the group that sponsor's Mother Jones in "About the Foundation for National Progress." Enjoy the ongoing debates!

Arts & Letters Daily

Arts and Letters Daily  is a web site Bob Brehme of the Reading Department has on his own web site. We will let his description invite you to visit it: "This is a portal site. It has no content of its own, but rather collects links to the day's most provocative articles in the arts and humanities. It also provides links to many newspapers and journals. Look down the left side for the Virtual Reference Desk. For researching current information, this is a great starting point."

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